Benefits of Technology in Education: From a Special Education View

I read the article on edweek.org that was titled Technology in Education: An Overview.  One of the subtopics this article focused on was how technology can benefit personalized learning.  The author of this article, Benjamin Herold, proves that technology can be beneficial for students and teachers because it can accommodate a lot of disabilities, or provide an alternative language to meet students specific needs.  Herold writes, “The idea is that digital devices, software, and learning platforms offer a once-unimaginable array of options for tailoring education to each individual student’s academic strengths and weaknesses, interests and motivations, personal preferences, and optimal pace of learning.”  Herold claims that technology can offer resources for a student that teachers cannot always offer, especially for students with disabilities.

Already, I have seen the benefits of technology used in my practicum classroom.  I am working with the Special Education program that is mostly 4th graders who struggle with dyslexia.  As I observed the students during their writing period, the Special Educator showed me how the students utilize features on Google Docs to assist their disability as he or she is writing their essays.  This electronic feature will provide not only spelling suggestion, but other words similar to the word the student is typing.  Further, this feature will also read the essay, singular sentence, or selected word, back to the student.  This benefits the students with dyslexia because they can listen to their papers, and make changes where they need to be implemented.  The students struggle with recognizing the misspelling of a word, so this feature will read each word back to the student, incase they used a similar word but not the correct one.  Or, if he or she thought they spelled a word correctly, but the audio is telling them the correct pronunciation of the word, they actually wrote, they are given suggestions of what they might have been trying to spell.  This is a simple example that proves the educational benefits of technology, especially for students with disabilities.

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